Nursing Assignment: Health Assessment of Children's Weight

Health Assessment of Children’s Weight

Body measurements can provide a general picture of whether a child is receiving adequate nutrition or is at risk for health issues. These data, however, are just one aspect to be considered. Lifestyle, family history, and culture—among other factors—are also relevant. That said, gathering and communicating this information can be a delicate process.

For this Discussion, you will consider examples of children with various weight issues. You will explore how you could effectively gather information and encourage parents and caregivers to be proactive about their children’s health and weight.

To prepare:

·         Consider the following examples of pediatric patients and their families:

o    Overweight 5-year-old boy with overweight parents

o    Slightly overweight 10-year-old girl with parents of normal weight

o    5-year-old girl of normal weight with obese parents

o    Slightly underweight 8-year-old boy with parents of normal weight

o    Severely underweight 12-year-old girl with underweight parents

·         Select one of the examples on which to focus for this Discussion. What health issues and risks may be relevant to the child you selected?

·         Based on the risks you identified, consider what further information you would need to gain a full understanding of the child’s health. Think about how you could gather this information in a sensitive fashion.

·         Consider how you could encourage parents or caregivers to be proactive toward the child’s health.

Post on or before Day 3 

 

Questions to be addressed in my paper:

1.     An explanation of the health issues and risks that are relevant to the child you selected.

2.     Describe additional information you would need in order to further assess his or her weight-related health.

3.     Taking into account the parents’ and caregivers’ potential sensitivities, list at least three specific questions you would ask about the child to gather more information.

4.     Provide at least two strategies you could employ to encourage the parents or caregivers to be proactive about their child’s health and weight.

5.   Summary with Conclusion

 

 

REMINDERS:

1)      2 pages (addressing the 5 questions above excluding the title page and reference page).

2)      Kindly follow APA format for the citation and references! References should be between the period of 2011 and 2016. Please utilize the references at least three below as much as possible and the rest from yours.

3)     Make headings for each question.

 

References:

Readings

·         Ball, J. W., Dains, J. E., Flynn, J. A., Solomon, B. S., & Stewart, R. W. (2015). Seidel’s guide to physical examination (8th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby.

o    Chapter 6, “Growth and Measurement” (pp. 79-94)

In this chapter, the authors explain examinations for growth, gestational age, and pubertal development. The authors also differentiate growth amongst the organ systems.

o    Chapter 7, “Nutrition” (pp. 95-113)

This chapter focuses on how nutrition affects growth, development, and health maintenance. The authors also provide guidelines for assessing nutrient intake.

o    Review of Chapter 26, “Recording Information” (pp. 616-631)

This chapter provides rationale and methods for maintaining clear and accurate records. The text also explores the legal aspects of patient records.

·         Sullivan, D. D. (2012). Guide to clinical documentation (2nd ed.). Philadelphia, PA: F. A. Davis.

o    Chapter 3, “Adult Preventative Care Visits” (pp. 37–64)

o    Chapter 4, “Pediatric Preventative Care Visits” (pp. 65–90)

·         Seidel, H. M., Ball, J. W., Dains, J. E., Flynn, J. A., Solomon, B. S., & Stewart, R. W. (2011). History subjective data checklist. In Mosby’s guide to physical examination (7th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby. (PDF) 
This History Subjective Data Checklist was published as a companion to Seidel’s guide to physical examination (8th ed.), by Ball, J. W., Dains, J. E., & Flynn, J. A. Copyright Elsevier (2015). From https://evolve.elsevier.com/

·         Gibbs, H., & Chapman-Novakofski, K. (2012). Exploring nutrition literacy: Attention to assessment and the skills clients need. Health, 4(3), 120–124.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

This study explores nutrition literacy. The authors examine the level of attention paid to health literacy among nutrition professionals, and the skills and knowledge needed to understand nutrition education.

·         Lifshitz, F. (2009). Nutrition and growth. Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology, 1(4), 157–163.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

In this article, the author emphasizes the necessity for accurately plotting weights and heights on a growth chart. The author also specifies chemical and social causes of malnutrition.

·         Centers for D
isease Control and Prevention. (2012). Childhood overweight and obesity. 
Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/ 

This website provides information about overweight and obese children. Additionally, the website provides basic facts about obesity and strategies to counteracting obesity.

·         Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2009). Clinical growth charts. 
Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/growthcharts/clinical_charts.htm

This website provides basic information on clinical growth charts. The website also supplies clinical growth charts for up to age 20.

Optional Resources

·         LeBlond, R. F., Brown, D. D., & DeGowin, R. L. (2009). DeGowin’s diagnostic examination (9th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw Hill Medical.

o    Chapter 4, “Vital Signs, Anthropometric Data, and Pain” (pp. 51–87)

This chapter explores vital signs, temperature, pulse, respirations, and blood pressure. In addition, the authors discuss body size measurements and pain assessment.

 

 

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